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Champions On and Off the Field 

Look for the CVM ads in Auburn Football Illustrated (official game program) at all home games. 


Mary Francis Garner

Mary Frances Garner Alabama fan, owner of “Little Feet,” and faithful client of  Auburn University’s College of Veterinary Medicine

Little Feet. 
Mary Francis Garner didn’t hesitate to call on Auburn when her 12-year-old golden retriever developed a large mass on his head in May of 2010. Little Feet was diagnosed with a skull sarcoma and treated by the Auburn oncology team led by Dr. William Brawner.After completing radiation, Little Feet is back to his “old self” and living a full and active life with his owners. 
Regardless of who you support on the gridiron, the winning team for veterinary care is Auburn University’s College of Veterinary Medicine.  What more can we say? 
Even “they” think so! 

The Garner house may be divided when it comes to football, but one thing they do agree on is where to seek state-of-the-art veterinary care for their cherished pet, Little Feet. 

Mary Francis Garner didn’t hesitate to call on Auburn when her 12-year-old golden retriever developed a large mass on his head in May of 2010. Little Feet was diagnosed with a skull sarcoma and treated by the Auburn oncology team led by Dr. William Brawner. After completing radiation, Little Feet is back to his “old self” and living a full and active life with his owners. 

Regardless of who you support on the gridiron, the winning team for veterinary care is Auburn University’s College of Veterinary Medicine.  What more can we say? Even “they” think so! 

 

 

The Brothers of Alpha Psi

On August 26, 2011, Acting Dean Calvin Johnson accepted a $1 million dollar pledge from current members and alumni of the Theta Chapter of Alpha Psi fraternity on behalf of the Auburn University College of Veterinary Medicine. 
This gift is made possible by proceeds from the Alpha Psi Rodeo which has been held each year since 1965 and serves as the fundraising catalyst for the many charitable contributions made by this generous organization. 
The Alpha Psi Rodeo has become one of the largest student-run events in the Southeast and helps to support organizations like Storybook Farm, Special Olympics,  Cops on Top, veterinary missions, and the Alabama Sheriffs’ Youth Ranches. 
This most recent gift is just one of the many ways the students, alumni and friends of the College of Veterinary Medicine are contributing to our community, our nation, and our world— and one more important reason to support this campaign. 

On August 26, 2011, Acting Dean Calvin Johnson accepted a $1 million dollar pledge from current members and alumni of the Theta Chapter of Alpha Psi fraternity on behalf of the Auburn University College of Veterinary Medicine. 

This gift is made possible by proceeds from the Alpha Psi Rodeo which has been held each year since 1965 and serves as the fundraising catalyst for the many charitable contributions made by this generous organization. 

The Alpha Psi Rodeo has become one of the largest student-run events in the Southeast and helps to support organizations like Storybook Farm, Special Olympics,  Cops on Top, veterinary missions, and the Alabama Sheriffs’ Youth Ranches. 

This most recent gift is just one of the many ways the students, alumni and friends of the College of Veterinary Medicine are contributing to our community, our nation, and our world— and one more important reason to support this campaign. 

 

 

  • November 19, 2011 - Auburn vs. Samford (Homecoming)
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The Southeastern Raptor Center Team

Since its modest beginning in the 
mid-1970s, the Southeastern Raptor Center has treated and released thousands of birds of prey back into the wild and educated countless school children on the merits of wildlife conservation. From the majestic stadium flights of War Eagle VII, to the comprehensive veterinary care provided to injured or orphaned raptors, the center continues to uphold its three-fold mission of conservation, education, and rehabilitation. 
These are just three of the ways the Southeastern Raptor Center is making valuable contributions to our schools, our communities, and our world— and three important reasons to support this campaign. 

Since its modest beginning in the mid-1970s, the Southeastern Raptor Center has treated and released thousands of birds of prey back into the wild and educated countless school children on the merits of wildlife conservation. From the majestic stadium flights of War Eagle VII, to the comprehensive veterinary care provided to injured or orphaned raptors, the center continues to uphold its three-fold mission of conservation, education, and rehabilitation. 

These are just three of the ways the Southeastern Raptor Center is making valuable contributions to our schools, our communities, and our world— and three important reasons to support this campaign. 

 

 

 

 

 

The Oncology Team: Dr. Ralph Henderson, Dr. Annette Smith and Dr. William Brawner

Auburn’s “one health” initiative unites
human and veterinary medicine and takes
laboratory research into the exam room
to prevent, diagnose and treat cancer and
other devastating illnesses in both humans
and pets. Resources and expertise are
shared to battle one of the most pressing
medical and economic challenges in our
society.
Each year Auburn’s veterinary oncology
team sees about 2500 patients with
approximately 750 of them visiting for
the first time. Armed with the latest
in chemotherapy protocols, targeted
radiation therapies and surgical expertise,
the oncology team is equipped with the
same state-of-the-art approaches used in
diagnosing and treating cancer in humans.
From the exploration of “suicide gene
therapy,” to a revolutionary new cellbased
vaccine, clinicians and scientists at
Auburn are pioneering new ways of using
molecular and cellular biology to prevent
and successfully treat our nation’s pet
population.
Cutting-edge research, state-of-the-art
diagnostics and prevention, and pioneering
treatment therapies are just three of
the ways Auburn’s oncology team is
contributing to the health and well-being of
our nation— and three important reasons
to support this campaign.

Auburn’s “one-health” initiative unites human and veterinary medicine and takes laboratory research into the exam room to prevent, diagnose and treat cancer and other devastating illnesses in both humans and pets.

Resources and expertise are shared to battle one of the most pressing medical and economic challenges in our society. Each year Auburn’s veterinary oncology team sees about 2500 patients with approximately 750 of them visiting for the first time. Armed with the latest in chemotherapy protocols, targeted radiation therapies and surgical expertise, the oncology team is equipped with the same state-of-the-art approaches used in diagnosing and treating cancer in humans.

From the exploration of “suicide genetherapy,” to a revolutionary new cell-based vaccine, clinicians and scientists at Auburn are pioneering new ways of using molecular and cellular biology to prevent and successfully treat our nation’s pet population.

Cutting-edge research, state-of-the-art diagnostics and prevention, and pioneering treatment therapies are just three of the ways Auburn’s oncology team is contributing to the health and well-being of our nation— and three important reasons to support this campaign.

Dwight Wolfe: Theriogenologist, Veterinary Professor, Member of the Alabama Livestock Hall of Fame and Protector of Our Nation's Food Supply

Theriogenology is a big word, but contributions made by Dwight Wolfe and many other food animal veterinarians like him are much bigger. A term coined in the 1970s, theriogenology denotes the study of animal reproduction. 

Food animal veterinarians have the unique responsibility not only for the worldwide care and treatment of livestock, but the eradication of threatening diseases, and the monitoring of national food safety via state, local, and federal agencies. 
Food animal veterinarians serve as the first line of defense against threats such as foot-and-mouth disease, anthrax, and salmonella, and keep watch over the meat, milk, and fiber found in our nation’s marketplaces. 
Your support of the College of Veterinary Medicine goes well beyond the productivity and well-being of food animals — it ensures the United States continues to enjoy the most wholesome, abundant, and economical food supply in the world.Theriogenology is a big word, but contributions made by Dwight Wolfe and many other food animal veterinarians like him are much bigger. A term coined in the 1970s, theriogenology denotes the study of animal reproduction. 

Food animal veterinarians have the unique responsibility not only for the worldwide
care and treatment of livestock, but the eradication of threatening diseases, and the monitoring of national food safety via state, local, and federal agencies. 

Food animal veterinarians serve as the first line of defense against threats such as foot-and-mouth disease, anthrax, and salmonella, and keep watch over the meat, milk, and fiber found in our nation’s marketplaces. 

Your support of the College of Veterinary Medicine goes well beyond the productivity and well-being of food animals — it ensures the United States continues to enjoy the most wholesome, abundant, and economical food supply in the world. 

 

  • September 24, 2011 - Auburn vs. Florida Atlantic
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Animal Health and Performance Program

Four-legged graduates of Auburn’s Canine Detection Training Center - one of the nation’s leaders in training bomb-sniffing dogs - work daily alongside their handlers to keep our citizens at the local, state, and national level out of harm’s way.

Novel approaches and unique abilities have placed Auburn dogs in vital roles, such as guarding the president during the 2009 inauguration,  protecting the U.S. Capitol, and helping safeguard soldiers and civilians in Iraq and Afghanistan. 
These are just three of the many ways the College of Veterinary Medicine is contributing to the safety of our nation, and three important reasons to support this campaign. 

Four-legged graduates of Auburn’s Canine Detection Training Center - one of the nation’s leaders in training bomb-sniffing dogs - work daily alongside their handlers to keep our citizens at the local, state, and national level out of harm’s way. 

Novel approaches and unique abilities have placed Auburn dogs in vital roles, such as guarding the president during the 2009 inauguration,  protecting the U.S. Capitol, and helping safeguard soldiers and civilians in Iraq and Afghanistan. 

These are just three of the many ways the College of Veterinary Medicine is contributing to the safety of our nation, and three important reasons to support this campaign. 

September 10, 2011 - Auburn vs. Mississippi State

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David Priest: Triathlete, Class President and Future Veterinarian

Students at the College of Veterinary Medicine are at the forefront of animal welfare, public health, national security, and disease prevention. 

As a world-class center for veterinary medicine and research, Auburn’s new veterinary teaching hospital will attract the best and brightest students and faculty from around the globe. 

With your help, the college will continue in its efforts to ensure the health and safety of our communities, our country, and our world.

September 3, 2011 - Auburn vs. Utah State

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